Plenty Of Points Available At The Deutsche Bank This Weekend

Gabe Morency

Friday, September 2, 2016 3:36 AM UTC

Friday, Sep. 2, 2016 3:36 AM UTC

Patrick Reed recorded a superb win at The Barclays last week to send him to the top of the FedEx Cup rankings leapfrogging Jason Day Dustin Johnson Adam Scott and Jordan Spieth. Focus now turns.
<p>Patrick Reed recorded a superb win at <a href="http://oddsmarket.com/golf-betting-preview-fedex-cup-race-begins-worlds-top-golfers/">The Barclays last week</a> to send him to the top of the FedEx Cup rankings, leapfrogging Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Adam Scott and Jordan Spieth. Focus now turns to the Deutsche Bank Championship and the chasing pack will be snapping at Reed’s heels as the race to win the $10 million top prize heats up.</p><p>The world’s leading golfers have now been whittled down from 125 to 100 as we approach the Deutsche Bank – the second of the four FedEx Cup tournaments – and afterwards the top 70 will head into the BMW Championship before the final 30 play off for the main prize in the Tour Championship.</p><p>Reed has a decent 380-point lead over Day but it is all expected to change drastically as there are plenty of points available at the Deutsche Bank. The winner gets 2,000 and the runner-up gets 1,200 and even the golfer finishing 46<sup>th</sup> gets 100 points.</p><p>Predictably favouritism for the Deutsche Bank goes in line with the world rankings: world number one Day is heavy favourite (<a href="http://www.sportsbookreview.com/Sportsbook/?v=4810&amp;book=Bet365">13/2 with Bet365</a>, William Hill and various others), followed by world number two Dustin Johnson, then world number three Jordan Spieth and so on. But these tournaments never unfold in that manner, and there is plenty of value across the card.</p><p>Rickie Fowler won it last year by a single stroke and is 28/1 with 888 Sport to make it twice in a row, which is a generous price when rival bookmakers will only go to 20/1. He was leading after three rounds in The Barclays but had a disappointing final round and could only tie for seventh in the end. That keeps him well in the hunt for the FedEx Cup, however, as he is in 16<sup>th</sup> place and there is still a lot to play for. He knows how to win on this course, TCP Boston, and looks a good each way shout at those odds.</p><p>An even better bet could be Spieth. The world number three has failed to hit the heights he achieved in 2015 – the meltdown in The Masters was a particular low point – but he has been in solid form recently and is improving, having finished 12<sup>th</sup> in the Baltursol and 10<sup>th</sup> of 125 in The Barclays.</p><p>He should really enjoy playing at TCP Boston as it is a course well suited to his game. Its fairways and greens are easy to hit, leading to low winning scores of between -15 and -22 in the past decade, and that should play into his hands as, while his drive is not as powerful and accurate as those of his big rivals, he is a superb putter and can be devastating on the green. He struggled a bit recently on the poa annual greens, and will welcome a return to the smoother bentgrass greens at TCP Boston. He was fourth on this course on his debut in 2013 and several mid-range hitters like Webb Simpson, Steve Stricker and Chris Kirk have won this title in recent years. You can imagine him and Day putting in a similar performance, but given that Day is 13/2 and you can get 12/1 on Spieth with most bookmakers, he seems a more attractive choice, particularly as you would still make a healthy profit if you went each way and he secured another top four finish.</p><p>If you’re looking for a longer shot, Brooks Koepka (45/1 with Sky Bet, Coral and various others) has seven finishes in the top 10 out of 19 events this year and a great putting record, so it will suit players of his ilk. The race is also on to win a wildcard pick for the US Ryder Cup team, so Daniel Berger (<a href="http://www.sportsbookreview.com/Sportsbook/?v=4810&amp;book=Bet365">80/1 with Bet365</a>) could be another option as he bids to force his way into contention.</p><p> </p>
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